Social dysfunction

n.noun
/so·cial/ /dys·func·tion/

Social dysfunction refers to one’s inability to appropriately adapt to a social situation due to mental illness or psychological disorder. Individuals who suffer from bipolar disorder, depression, oppositional defiance disorder, autism, aspergers, or other types of disorders are likely to display social dysfunction on a regular basis.

Troubled teens who display social dysfunction, do so, for a variety of different reasons. Teens who are incapable of functioning in social situations are not a small minority but a large portion of our nation’s youth. Factors such as, problems at home, failing grades, drug and/or alcohol addiction, psychological disorder or immaturity can all be the cause or contributing force behind social dysfunction.

Teens who struggle with social dysfunction are more likely to self medicate with drugs and alcohol, self harm or other dangerous addictions. It is important for parents to act immediately after realizing their child struggles with social dysfunction. If untreated, teens who struggle socially are at great risk and will continue to develop poor social and behavioral habits.