Group Therapy

n.noun
group ther·a·py

a form of psychotherapy in which a group of patients meet to describe and discuss their problems together under the supervision of a therapist.

Group therapy is designed to give individuals a safe environment to work out personal issues and work through therapeutic and emotional obstacles. Patients often gain insight into their own issues and offer suggestions in order to help others out through their own, individual problems. Group therapy sessions are mainly conducted under the supervision of a psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker or other healthcare professional.

In addition to the many benefits of group therapy, patients who have a difficult time with interpersonal relationships can benefit from the social interactions that are a basic part of the group therapy experience.

Group therapy is a great form of treatment for troubled teens. Teens who participate in group therapy are more likely to find solace because of their environment. When a teen is surrounded by other teens who they can not only relate to, but help work through their own psychological short-comings, group therapy becomes a powerful tool for any troubled teenage boy or girl.